PODCAST

TIMES

DOCTORS PRINT 3D PROSTATE TO GUIDE SURGERY

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Prokar Dasgupta and his team at Guy’s Hospital in London held the 3D copy in their hands as they used a £2 million robot to cut away the tumour.

WHY DOCTORS MAKE THE WORST PATIENTS

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The cardiologist with heart disease, the psychiatrist with depression, the plastic surgeon who wants new breasts... Who do doctors turn to when they need help?

DAILY MAIL

MEET THE BEST UROLOGISTS IN BRITAIN

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Ask most people how prostate cancer is treated and the chances are they’ll say ‘surgery’. In fact, surgery — removal of the prostate — is just one weapon in the arsenal of procedures.

Who's the best surgeon for your prostate cancer

Men in Britain are not routinely screened for prostate cancer, partly because the ­technique for doing this, the PSA (prostate-­specific antigen) blood test, which measures the protein produced by the ­prostate, is unreliable.

Some men with prostate cancer don’t have a raised PSA level, and two-thirds of men with a raised PSA don’t have prostate ­cancer — just an infection or an enlarged prostate, which comes with ageing.

Prostate cancers are slow growing, and the lack of scientific consensus in this field means it can be difficult for surgeons to decide whether to ­operate or ­simply ­regularly monitor the patient until it grows.

THE GUARDIAN

SURVIVING PROSTATE CANCER: A PROSTATE SURGEON'S STORY

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Professor Roger Kirby is one of the world's leading prostate surgeons. So when he developed prostate cancer last year he knew exactly what he was up against. He tells Simon Garfield about his operation – and life as a patient

'REMOTE' SURGERY TURNING POINT

Kidney operations performed by robots give better results than surgeon's hand, says study

A PIONEERING study by British doctors has revealed that a robot is better than a human surgeon at carrying out a complex kidney operation - even when the robot is controlled by doctors 4,000 miles away.

The breakthrough paves the way for thousands of operations to be performed with robotic engineering, which appears to be safer and more accurate than conventional procedures. Unlike humans, robot 'arms' do not shake when they target a small piece of tissue or organ.

BOTOX: NOW IT'S NOT JUST FOR WRINKLES

Just another vanity project or could Botox injections help to treat migraine? Now experts are finding new and surprising uses for the 'face-freezing' agent derived from rancid sausages.

Botox, the anti-wrinkle treatment which has been used to smooth away lines and firm up ageing bodies, now has a new use - as a cure for incontinence.

Doctors have pioneered a painless technique which involves injecting tiny quantities of the nerve agent into the bladder wall, to help people with the embarrassing and debilitating condition for whom other treatment has failed.

TELEGRAPH

MARYLEBONE JOURNAL

ROBO-OP: HOW ROBOTIC SURGERY IS TRANSFORMING THE LIVES OF PROSTATE CANCER SUFFERERS

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It's a scene to make you squirm. On the table is a 3D model of a part of a man's body, while overhead an arrangement of James Bond-like lasers dance with venomous glee. But this isn't a 21st Century torture scene; it's the home of a high-tech medical practice that is promising to change the way prostate cancer is treated in the UK.

Q&A

PROF PROKAR DASGUPTA

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Consultant urologist at The London Clinic and this year’s recipient of the prestigious St Peter’s medal, talks robotic surgery, innovation and the search for synergy

 

INTERVIEW: VIEL RICHARDSON
IMAGES: JOSEPH FOX

EVENING STANDARD

DANCER HAS KIDNEY REMOVED THROUGH HER BELLY-BUTTON

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A dancer has become the first teenager in Europe to undergo a revolutionary procedure to remove an organ through a tiny incision in the belly button.

SURGEONS USE 3D-PRINTED MODEL OF PROSTATE IN PIONEERING OPERATION

Surgeons have for the first time in the NHS used a 3D-printed copy of a patient’s prostate to help them remove the cancerous gland.

They held the replica prostate in their hands as they used a £2 million robot to cut it free, ensuring they excised the tumour but minimised the risk of causing impotence and incontinence.

The procedure is the latest at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS trust using 3D printing. Last November, a team of doctors used the technique during the transplant of a kidney from a father into his three-year-old daughter.

PIONEERING OPERATION TECHNOLOGY ALLOWS EXPERTS TO SUPERVISE FROM MILES AWAY

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Doctors at Guy’s Hospital are the first to operate on a prostate cancer patient with the lead surgeon nowhere to be seen.

Patient Ian Titheridge, 50, is recovering well following the procedure which used “augmented” reality.